“Paper or Plastic?” What You Need to Know About the Bag Ban

grocery-bag-ban.jpegOn November 8, California voters said “yes” to Proposition 67 – supporting an end to plastic bags polluting our waters and endangering marine life.

We’re proud of our state for supporting legislation that protects our coast from millions of plastic bags polluting the environment.

Now that the election’s over, what does the bag ban mean for your average trip to the grocery store? We’re here to get you up to speed.

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Guests Among Wildlife: Part IV

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Photo Credit: David Ohman

The coast and its residents 

As with the entire Pacific Coast, Orange County is blessed with some unique ecosystems including the Bolsa Chica wetlands (reopened with great applause to the ocean tides about seven years ago) and the Upper Newport Bay and Back Bay. 

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What is Polluted Runoff?

How to tackle Orange County’s sneakiest form of pollution

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Sometimes it’s obvious where pollution comes from. We know that when rain rushes down our storm drains, it carries hazardous chemicals from industrial and sewage treatment plants, manufacturers and scrap yards into our local waters. However, one form of pollution is much more difficult to pinpoint – polluted runoff.

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Guests Among Wildlife: Part III

 

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Photo Credit: David Ohman

The Back Bay and its residents

The Back Bay is home to fish and nesting sea birds, which attracts egrets, blue herons, osprey, foxes, coyotes and bobcats. 

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Guests Among Wildlife: Part II

What to do when you encounter a wild animal

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Photo Credit: David Ohman

For those with little or no experience encountering wildlife outside an animated film, members of the wildlife community don't dance, sing or talk, at least not with us. Don’t crowd them or attempt to feed them, especially by hand. Either they fear you, hate you, love your garden, or consider you an essential food group. Let’s just take a few examples of Southern California wildlife to make the point.

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Talking Trash: Join the World’s Largest Beach Cleanup

sculpture-coastal-cleanup.jpgEvery year, over eight million metric tons of plastic enter our oceans and more than 4.5 trillion cigarette butts litter our beaches. 

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Guests Among Wildlife: Part I

Humans are visitors among native Southern California wildlife, which occupies a lot of territory

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Photo Credit: David Ohman

The highest point of land in Orange County sits 5,690 feet above sea level overlooking about 948 square miles of mountains, canyons, hills, wetlands, flatlands and the coast. The 40 mile-long coastline is festooned with placid, secret coves with sultry tide pools brimming with life, estuaries, wetlands and sprawling, yacht-infested harbors. It’s a star-studded show if ever there was one.

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The 10,000 Pound Beach Cleanup

Kids picking up trash

It used to be that when you walked down the beach all you could feel was the sand and water between your toes, maybe a shell or two.

These days, when you go to the beach, you won’t only find sand and shells.  You will find trash and a lot of it.

Five years ago we set out to change this, launching a monthly beach cleanup program with Coastal Playground, every second Saturday of the month, at Huntington State Beach.

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Our Legal Interns Save Oceans: Meet Don Gourlie

Coastkeeper legal interns like Don gain valuable experience in environmental law.Thinking about saving the planet with a career in environmental justice? First of all, that’s amazing. Second, have you considered our competitive legal internship? It could be the perfect opportunity for you to gain real-world experience in environmental law and public policy. 

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Sea Change at Kids Ocean Day

Kids Ocean Day fun
Photo Credit: Shot Hunters Media

This week, 1,300 kids spent the morning cleaning up trash at Huntington Beach for Kids Ocean Day. Joined by nearly 200 teachers and volunteers, this crew removed over 500 pounds of trash from our waters. For ocean lovers like us, it was the best day ever.

After an hour and a half of cleanup in the morning, we all came together on the sparkling-clean sand to get creative and “sea change” with some aerial artwork.

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