The Super Bloom of a Lifetime: Agave Watch

agave-plant2.jpegAgave Watch at the Coastkeeper Garden has begun. The Garden’s impressively large Agave Americana, or Blue Agave, is preparing to bloom. A large flower stalk appeared on March 29 and is growing an astonishing six inches a day. We anticipate that the stalk will bloom sometime in June.  

Already striking at more than 13 feet tall and 11 feet wide, the Coastkeeper Garden’s magnificent Agave will produce a flower stalk that is 20 to 30 feet high. This flower stalk, which will be as thick as a telephone pole, resembles an enormous asparagus spear. The branches of the stalk will be covered with masses of yellow flowers that will produce baby Agave plants.

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Clean Water Advocacy: Talking Pollution with Rep. Sanchez’s Office

protect OC watersHere in Orange County, clean water lets our kids and families enjoy a day at the beach without worrying about getting sick. It allows our coastal environment and wildlife to thrive. It fuels our tourist economy.

As Coastkeeper’s Senior Staff Attorney, Colin Kelly understands that Orange County runs on clean water and believes the best way to protect our communities is to defend policies that keep our waters safe. In 2017, this work is more important than ever.

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Newport's Eelgrass and Its Residents: Mollusks

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Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National. Photo Source and License

Scallops, Oysters and Mussels are all mollusks but there are a few more not-as-well known mollusks that live in the eelgrass beds of Newport Bay. Introducing the California Jackknife, Navanax, Bubble Snail, and the Sea Hares.

 

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Business Runs Better on Clean Water

metal_casting_facility1.jpegCoastkeeper works to safeguard Orange County’s 42 miles of coastline and protect its invaluable fishable, swimmable, drinkable and sustainable waters. We are now the region’s principal steward of clean water, using the federal Clean Water Act and California Coastal Act to protect, preserve and restore Orange County’s coastal waters, rivers and streams.

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One of Newport Bay’s Strongest Defenses Against Bacteria Contamination is Safe - For Now

Newport Bay clean waterIt’s time to celebrate.

Last week, the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board took the consideration to remove its regulations for bacteria levels in Newport Bay off its meeting agenda. For now, those water-quality regulations, known as total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), are safe.

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What the First Rain of the Season Means for Orange County Water Quality

runoff-2.jpegAfter a long, dry summer, fall has Orange County feeling a little fresher. The air is crisp, kids zip up their jackets on the way to school - and we finally see the first signs of rain.

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How Rain Makes the Coastkeeper Garden Shine

garden-2.jpegHere at the Coastkeeper Garden, we’re pulling out all the stops to be responsible with this season’s most precious resource – rainwater.

The Garden is equipped with several bioswales — landscaping elements that remove silt and pollution from surface runoff water. These bioswales help prevent flooding and keep polluted water from flowing into our waterways.

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“Paper or Plastic?” What You Need to Know About the Bag Ban

grocery-bag-ban.jpegOn November 8, California voters said “yes” to Proposition 67 – supporting an end to plastic bags polluting our waters and endangering marine life.

We’re proud of our state for supporting legislation that protects our coast from millions of plastic bags polluting the environment.

Now that the election’s over, what does the bag ban mean for your average trip to the grocery store? We’re here to get you up to speed.

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Guests Among Wildlife: Part IV

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Photo Credit: David Ohman

The coast and its residents 

As with the entire Pacific Coast, Orange County is blessed with some unique ecosystems including the Bolsa Chica wetlands (reopened with great applause to the ocean tides about seven years ago) and the Upper Newport Bay and Back Bay. 

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What is Polluted Runoff?

How to tackle Orange County’s sneakiest form of pollution

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Sometimes it’s obvious where pollution comes from. We know that when rain rushes down our storm drains, it carries hazardous chemicals from industrial and sewage treatment plants, manufacturers and scrap yards into our local waters. However, one form of pollution is much more difficult to pinpoint – polluted runoff.

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